How a Boxer Engine Works

How a Boxer Engine Works:

Engines that are flat in design like Subaru's Boxer are nothing new. Designs like these, which gives are generally much better than types such as the inline and v-type engines, rather integrates horizontally opposed banks was patented in 1896 and has since been executed by Volkswagen, Porsche, Subaru, and most notably, the Chevrolet Corvair . In a time around the 1960s, Subaru fully embraced the Boxer layout due to the success of the Volkswagen bug and the Chevrolet Corvair, which today remains the company's exclusive engine configuration.


 

Subaru's reason for using the boxer design is that it's not complex. Horizontally opposed layout lends itself well to low centers of gravity and exceptional weight bias, like in an event of their BRZ and business's together constructed Scion FR-S where engine's crank-shaft and pistons are placed low and laterally centered in a vehicle in methods that would otherwise be hopeless for any other type of engine. Results are better stability and better vehicle control, which can be partly what makes Toyota's latest creation's so special.

 

 

The Boxer Design - How it Works

 

 

The Boxer layout is not all that mind-boggling and is not all that distinct from any other engine that requires clues from an instruction manual that is four stroke. Picture a 60-degree engine where its V shape is formed by its two banks. Now picture a 90-degree engine where an even broader V contour is formed by its two banks. Raise that V contour -degrees and you have got a Boxer engine. As it happens, it wouldn't be a completely cockamamie thing to say that a Boxer layout is really only a 180-degree engine that has a convenient V-type design.

 

 

Engines known as the 'fighter' engines get their name that concurrently go toward and away from one another in a flat plane, much like fighters colliding their gloves together. A Fighter engine's back and forth motion of any two of the pistons that are similar negates out one another's vibrations due to many factors including things such as ignition and also reciprication forces in methods that are both inline and V type engine designs never could without causing the systems to become damp and complex crank-shaft to become counterweight. But this does not mean that four-cylinder Boxer engines are easy and free.

 

 

Subaru's latest 2.0L Boxer engine is not its most strong, but tuners everywhere are starting to realize why it might be so specific. Maybe the best thing is the fact that Subaru chose to not put an engine cover on the latest 2.0L boxer engine. This presents a better visual of the engine and much more pleasing engine sounds in the cabin of the vehicle. A missing hunk -black plastic is only a start, though. Although, at first glance, FA20 seems to be completely Subaru, its square arrangement is Toyota-like and, gossip is its cylinder heads were developed by Yamaha, who is no stranger cylinder head development.

 

 

To help realize what kind of control and handling its originators were looking for, FA20 was made more compact than preceding four-cylinder Boxer engine designs by developing a shallower and shorter intake manifold oil pan. The engine sits even lower to optimize total equilibrium and the car's center of gravity, something which remains instrumental to the great satisfaction of driving a BRZ/FR-S.

 

If you need any Subaru boxer engine parts go to Monza Auto Parts.

 

 

Anthony Johnson Nascar   

About the author:

Anthony Johnson is the owner and President of Monza Motion, LLC which owns and operates two companies out of Hamilton, Ohio. Monza Auto Parts which is the retail side of the business and Monza Energy is the powerplant research and development division. Anthony is an avid motorsports fan and classic car collector. He has a passion for the Chevrolet Corvair, which is a car that has forever changed America. He has a degree in Computer Forensics and Network Security from SWFC and is considered an Information Security expert. Anthony has worked with the DoD and major financial institutions across the United States.

 

 

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